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lunes, 11 de mayo de 2015

informacion sobre las exportaciones /importaciones de gas natural de los EEUU.

U.S. Natural Gas Imports & Exports 2014

With data for 2014  |  Release date: May 11, 2015  |  Next Release Date: May 2016     Print

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Summary

Preliminary data show a 6% increase for domestic dry natural gas production in 2014 to 25,718 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record level for the United States. This higher level of natural gas production had the effect of displacing gross natural gas imports, which decreased by 7% in 2014 to 2,695 Bcf. As a result, net imports of natural gas (imports minus exports) in the United States fell 9% in 2014, continuing a decline that began in 2007. As has been the trend in recent years, higher domestic production of natural gas reduced U.S. reliance on foreign natural gas and kept U.S. natural gas prices lower than natural gas prices in Europe and Asia.
  five-year
average
2013 2014 2014 vs. five-year
average
2014 vs. 2013
Imports (Bcf)
Pipeline 3,095.7  2,786.5  2,635.9 -15% -5%
LNG 300.7 96.9 59.2 -80% -39%
CNG     0.3   na
Total 3,396.4 2,883.4 2,695.4 -21% -7%
Exports
Pipleline 1,341.3 1,569.4 1,492.4 11% -5%
LNG 17.5 0.2 13.6 -22% 6739%
LNG re-exports 22.4 2.7 2.7 -88% -2%
CNG   0.1 0.2   89%
Total 1,381.2 1,572.4 1,508.9 9% -4%
Net 2,015.2 1,310.9 1,186.5 -41% -9%
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy.


The natural gas imports/exports market continues to undergo changes:
  • Lower natural gas imports from Canada resulted in the decline of net imports in 2014, which were 41% below the five-year average.
  • Natural gas imports to the United States, 98% of which arrive via pipeline from Canada, have decreased almost every year since 2007, and in 2014 reached the lowest level (2,636 Bcf) since January 1995.
  • Natural gas exports from the United States decreased 4% in 2014 to 1,509 Bcf, but they remained 9% above the five-year average. Natural gas exports to Mexico increased 10% in 2014, setting a record, but exports to Mexico did not offset the 16% decline of natural gas exports to Canada.
  • The United States also traded liquefied natural gas (LNG) and compressed natural gas (CNG) with its partners, but these volumes were minimal in 2014.
  five-year
average
2013 2014 2014 vs. five-year
average
2014 vs. 2013
Pipeline $0.18 $0.33 $0.18 3% -45%
LNG $5.18 $6.56 $6.81 32% 4%
CNG na na $0.03   na
Total $0.25 $0.25 $0.21 -15% -13%
Note: Henry Hub prices are available from 1997 to 2012. Except re-export prices, both import and export prices include transportation cost. LNG re-export prices are included in LNG prices.
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy.



The average price difference between natural gas exports and imports (price differential) was 15% lower than the five-year average at $0.21 per thousand cubic feet (Mcf) in 2014. The pipeline import prices were 7% greater than the pipeline export prices in 2014 compared with 2013 prices, resulting in a net decrease of the price differential in 2014.
After 2008, the price of natural gas traded at Henry Hub in Louisiana, the national benchmark for U.S. natural gas, dropped by nearly half, to an average of $3.94/Mcf in 2009. Because most U.S. LNG import prices are linked to Henry Hub prices, LNG import prices fell by 60% to $4.59/Mcf in 2009 and have remained between $4.59/Mcf and $8.80/Mcf. Additionally, higher LNG demand from abroad, especially from Japan after the Fukushima nuclear crisis in 2011, contributed to the increase of the LNG price differential to $8.56/Mcf in 2012 and to $6.81/Mcf in 2014. However, the United States imported significantly less LNG in 2014 than in previous years, which lessened the effects of the high LNG price differential on the total average price differential.